arrow-right cart chevron-down chevron-left chevron-right chevron-up close menu minus play plus search share user email pinterest facebook instagram snapchat tumblr twitter vimeo youtube subscribe dogecoin dwolla forbrugsforeningen litecoin amazon_payments american_express bitcoin cirrus discover fancy interac jcb master paypal stripe visa diners_club dankort maestro trash

Shopping Cart



6 Cool Materials to
Wear in the Summer

The fabrics our clothes are made of impact how comfortable they are to wear in the summer. In high temperatures many clothes can feel unbearable to wear. We’ve compiled a list of the best materials to wear in hot weather.

Silk

Silk is a natural fabric that is very fast drying. Silk garments won’t feel sticky to your body and are cool and airy. The only downside is that garments made of silk can be quite delicate.

Linen

Linen is extremely fast drying and feels pleasantly airy to wear. It’s also a more sustainable choice and has basically never gone out of style.

Seersucker

Seersucker is another timeless fabric that is pleasant to wear on a hot summer day. It’s a sheer, bubbly cotton fabric that is extremely breathable. Seersucker has been very popular lately, even though it never really gone out of style.

Viscose / Lyocell / Tencel

We have many names for the things we love. Lyocell and Tencel are just different brands for viscose fabric. Viscose is made of wood pulp that has been turned into fabric through a chemical process. Despite not being a traditional natural fabric, it’s still breathable and feels pleasant to wear during the summer.

Hemp

Hemp is very similar to linen but is often blended with cotton to feel more comfortable. Just like linen, hemp feels cool to the touch, since it has an infallible ability to breathe and hold liquids without feeling damp.

Eco Labeled Cotton

Cotton can be comfortable to wear in the heat. The fabric can retain a lot of liquids that slowly evaporates and makes the garment cooler. A sheer and light cotton fabric is preferred before a thicker and dark one.

What Not to Wear

Cotton can be comfortable to wear in the heat. The fabric can retain a lot of liquids that slowly evaporates and makes the garment cooler. A sheer and light cotton fabric is preferred before a thicker and dark one.

 




6 Cool Materials to
Wear in the Summer

The fabrics our clothes are made of impact how comfortable they are to wear in the summer. In high temperatures many clothes can feel unbearable to wear. We’ve compiled a list of the best materials to wear in hot weather.

Silk

Silk is a natural fabric that is very fast drying. Silk garments won’t feel sticky to your body and are cool and airy. The only downside is that garments made of silk can be quite delicate.

Linen

Linen is extremely fast drying and feels pleasantly airy to wear. It’s also a more sustainable choice and has basically never gone out of style.

Seersucker

Seersucker is another timeless fabric that is pleasant to wear on a hot summer day. It’s a sheer, bubbly cotton fabric that is extremely breathable. Seersucker has been very popular lately, even though it never really gone out of style.

Viscose / Lyocell / Tencel

We have many names for the things we love. Lyocell and Tencel are just different brands for viscose fabric. Viscose is made of wood pulp that has been turned into fabric through a chemical process. Despite not being a traditional natural fabric, it’s still breathable and feels pleasant to wear during the summer.

Hemp

Hemp is very similar to linen but is often blended with cotton to feel more comfortable. Just like linen, hemp feels cool to the touch, since it has an infallible ability to breathe and hold liquids without feeling damp.

Eco Labeled Cotton

Cotton can be comfortable to wear in the heat. The fabric can retain a lot of liquids that slowly evaporates and makes the garment cooler. A sheer and light cotton fabric is preferred before a thicker and dark one.

What Not to Wear

Cotton can be comfortable to wear in the heat. The fabric can retain a lot of liquids that slowly evaporates and makes the garment cooler. A sheer and light cotton fabric is preferred before a thicker and dark one.

 




How to Take Care of
Your Silk Garments

Silk has many qualities making it both luxurious and useful, but you need to take care of it to make it last. We share everything you need to know about caring for your silk garments.

Silk is a more sustainable material with a lot of great features. It’s insulating qualities keep you warm in cooler climates. Silk also transports moisture and is therefore perfect to wear on a hot summer day. All silk garments are a dream to use, but they require some special care.

 

Silk Care Advice

Storing Silk Garments

Silk fabric is fragile and easily worn down. That’s why it’s important to make sure that you don’t overcrowd your closet. Blouses and dresses made of silk are best hanging on sturdy, wooden hangers and not on thin hangers that will cause an unnecessary tear.

Read the Care Label

Some silk garments will stain from water. Remember to read the care label before washing it. If the instructions say not to wash with water, hand it into your nearest environmentally friendly dry cleaner.

How to Wash Silk Garments

In general, wash your silk garment as seldom as possible, and when you need to wash them, we strongly recommend hand washing. Silk garments can also be washed on the wool cycle spin in your washing machine but remember that machine washing can make your silk garments lose shape and color.

  • Air often, wash less. Make a habit of airing your silk garments after use. This will make them feel and smell fresh again. Also try our Fabric Spray to refresh your clothes and prevent smells. Silk garments rarely need to be washed more often than a few times per year, depending on your frequency of use. The fabric is naturally resistant to dirt and dust. But be quick to remove spills before they become stains.
  • Use and enzyme-free detergent. Silk fabrics consist of animal protein, and a regular enzyme-based detergent will dissolve the fabric, making it brittle. Instead, you should use a surfactant-based and eco-friendly laundry detergent like our Delicate Laundry Detergent.
  • Wash on the wool cycle. If you can’t stand the idea of handwashing. Always use a laundry bag and never fill up the machine to more than half. You can wash together with wool garments, but keep in mind to never mix colors since silk can bleed color.
  • Wash at 30ºC or lower. Never wash silk at higher temperatures than 30ºC. Most silk garments can be washed on a single instance at 40ºC on a regular cycle, if you want to remove a grease stain. But we recommend you to be careful if you want to maintain the luster and color of the fabric.

Hang Dry in The Shade

Silk is fast drying, thanks to its ability to transport moisture. Avoid hanging your silk garments in direct sunlight, it can bleach the fabric. Also remember to never tumble dry your silk garments.

Stain Treatment

Be quick to remove spills before they stain your garment. Rinse with cold water and rub the stain gently (from the inside) with laundry detergent or bile soap if needed. Acetone or chemically pure petrol can be used on grease stains. Be careful and try it on a discrete spot before treating the stain, you don’t want the chemical to ruin your fabric. Most important is to act at once and not wait until your next laundry day. Please note that most stain removers found in stores should not be used on silk fabrics.

Steam Your Silk Garments

Always steam silk garments. When ironing, you’re at risk of scorching the fabric. The steam will gently remove creases and wrinkles and add luster to the fabric. The hot steam from a steamer also removes odors and kills bacteria.

And this is all you need to know about caring for silk. If you’re someone who isn’t afraid of giving your clothes some tender love and caring, a silk garment is an investment made to last a lifetime.




5 More Sustainable
Fabrics

This is our five tips on more sustainable materials to look for when shopping new garments. But remember, the most sustainable material is the one found in the clothes you already own.

Choose Second Hand

Buying second hand is the single most sustainable choice, when it comes to buying clothes. A Swedish study shows that the Co2–emissions from buying one pair of jeans is the equivalent of buying 197 pre-loved ones. And a new winter coat’s emission is equal to buying 394 second hand ones.

With this said, there are occasions when your problem can’t be solved by the second hand market. Here you can make a difference by simply choosing more sustainable materials.

Five more sustainable materials

Linen

Linen is a natural fabric made from the flax plant. The plant grows in cold and rainy climates. It’s naturally resistant to many diseases and doesn’t require the use of pesticides. Always choose linen instead of cotton, when possible, as growing cotton is a process that requires a lot of water and chemical usage. Cotton is also grown in warmer climates, with the fabric ending up travelling halfway across the globe. Learn more about linen here.

Linen clothes are comfortable to wear, and when properly cared for they will last for years. Linen is also great for people with allergies, as it’s naturally dust repellant.

Lyocell/Tencel

Lyocell, also known as Tencel, is a cellulose-based fabric, and is manufactured by chemically processing wood. The process is more energy-efficient and its chemicals are reused, which is a major difference from the manufacturing of the similar fabrics viscose and rayon.

Despite not being a natural fabric, it’s very comfortable to wear and is sometimes referred to as “fake silk”. Lyocell is also more durable, making these garments likely to last longer. Choose lyocell over synthetic fibers such as polyester and nylon.

Silk

Silk is a natural fabric made from cocoons from the silk larvae. The process does not require any pesticides, but chemical fertilizers might occur. The silk fabric is often perceived as luxurious and timeless, and if you take good care of your silk garment, it can last for generations.

Econyl (and other recycled
synthetics)

Econyl is made of recycled plastics, and is a better option over nylon, polyester and other synthetic fibers that are similar to plastic, that requires lots of chemicals, dissolvents or residues from oil to be manufactured.

The disadvantage is that Econyl releases microplastics when washing, which cannot be filtered by wastewater treatment plants, making them go straight out into our lakes and seas.

Econyl is good for swimwear and accessories that are not washed as often. Invest in a laundry bag that collects microplastics from synthetic garments.

Hemp

From hemp you can manufacture fabric in a similar way as the flax plant. Just like the flax plant, industrial hemp can be grown in cold and rainy climates and requires no pesticides or chemical fertilizers. The fabric is similar to linen, and it can be mixed with for instance ecological cotton to gain other qualities.

Look for sustainable labels

It’s also good to look for certificates such as GOTS for cotton, and Fairtrade certificates that mean that workers are treated fairly. There are many more out there, but not all should be trusted, as they may lack supervision.rom hemp you can manufacture fabric in a similar way as the flax plant. Just like the flax plant, industrial hemp can be grown in cold and rainy climates and requires no pesticides or chemical fertilizers. The fabric is similar to linen, and it can be mixed with for instance ecological cotton to gain other qualities.

 


Hemp

From hemp you can manufacture fabric in a similar way as the flax plant. Just like the flax plant, industrial hemp can be grown in cold and rainy climates and requires no pesticides or chemical fertilizers. The fabric is similar to linen, and it can be mixed with for instance ecological cotton to gain other qualities.

Look for sustainable labels

It’s also good to look for certificates such as GOTS for cotton, and Fairtrade certificates that mean that workers are treated fairly. There are many more out there, but not all should be trusted, as they may lack supervision.rom hemp you can manufacture fabric in a similar way as the flax plant. Just like the flax plant, industrial hemp can be grown in cold and rainy climates and requires no pesticides or chemical fertilizers. The fabric is similar to linen, and it can be mixed with for instance ecological cotton to gain other qualities.